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Frequently Asked Questions

Here are answers to some common questions about COVID-19, the vaccines, and guidance.
If you don't see an answer to your question in the FAQs, please ask us. We are here to help.

02. Vaccines (7)

All healthcare providers in the state enter immunization data into the state IDPH I-CARE system. CCDPH has access to vaccination records through the Illinois Comprehensive Automated Immunization Registry Exchange (I-CARE) system. You can see vaccination data for the CCDPH jurisdiction on our ShinyApp: https://ccdphcd.shinyapps.io/covid19/. For more information about I-CARE visit:https://dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/prevention-wellness/immunization/icare.html.

Category: 02. Vaccines

Usually the answer is yes, but it can be complicated depending on exactly what vaccine the person received. If you have a primary doctor, they can help you decide what vaccines you need. If you don’t, go to a location that has COVID-19 vaccines and ask to speak to someone who can help you. Most pharmacists at the drug store can help.

Category: 02. Vaccines

Yes. As of October 21, 2021, the most current recommendations are: There are now booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. Eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a booster dose. Some people may have a preference for the vaccine type that they originally received, and others may prefer to get a different booster. CDC’s recommendations now allow for this type of mix and match dosing for booster shots.

Category: 02. Vaccines
The vaccines are working very well to prevent the worst cases of COVID-19 that lead to hospitalization or death, even against the highly contagious Delta variant. The virus is constantly changing and scientists are seeing reduced protection against mild and moderate disease. A booster dose is recommended for all individuals 18 years and older if it has been at least 6 months after receiving their second Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, or at least two months after receiving the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine.
Category: 02. Vaccines

A booster shot is recommended due to concern that the effectiveness of the vaccine decreases over time and may not protect against a new strain, such as delta. Doctors use the term third dose when referring to people with compromised immune systems who may not have gotten the level of protection needed from the first two doses. The third dose provides additional immunity.

Tags: Boosters, Vaccine
Category: 02. Vaccines

Millions of Americans are now eligible to get a COVID-19 booster dose. The most current recommendations as of October 21, 2021 are:

For individuals who received a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, the following groups are eligible for a booster shot at 6 months or more after their initial series:

  • 65 years and older
  • Age 18+ who live in long-term care settings
  • Age 18+ who have underlying medical conditions
  • Age 18+ who work or live in high-risk settings.

For the nearly 15 million people who got the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, booster shots are also recommended for those who are 18 and older and who were vaccinated two or more months ago.

There are now booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. Eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a booster dose. Some people may have a preference for the vaccine type that they originally received, and others may prefer to get a different booster. CDC’s recommendations now allow for this type of mix and match dosing for booster shots.

Category: 02. Vaccines

The COVID-19 vaccines are extremely effective in protecting fully vaccinated people from catching and spreading the virus. Unvaccinated people are 11 times more likely to die of COVID-19 than fully vaccinated people (according to CDC data, August 2021). While COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective, no vaccine provides 100% immunity.

Because this is a new virus, scientists and medical experts continue to monitor how long immunity lasts, how well the vaccines protect against new variants of the virus, and whether some groups may need additional doses. Secretary Powell, while vaccinated, was also being treated for Parkinson’s disease and multiple myeloma, a form of blood cancer. The medications he had to take for his health conditions made the vaccine less effective. This is one reason why it is so important for other people to get vaccinated, to protect people with health conditions like Secretary Powell from getting COVID.

Category: 02. Vaccines

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