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Gonorrhea & 
Chlamydia Toolkit for 
Healthcare Providers

Like many sexually transmitted diseases (STD) or sexually transmitted infections (STI), gonorrhea and chlamydia rates are on the rise. In addition, antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea is increasing in parts of the United States. Like you, we are concerned.

We Need Your Help

Health care providers can play a critically important role in helping to reduce gonorrhea and chlamydia in suburban Cook County by taking the following actions:

Report. It’s The Law

Report gonorrhea and chlamydia to the health department as soon as possible but within 7 days so we can help you, your patients and their partners. Fax Completed Morbidity Report Form To: (708) 836-5450. Click here for the Morbidity Report Form from the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH). View video at right for instructions on how to complete the Morbidity Report Form.

Test and treat.

Encourage gonorrhea and chlamydia testing in any patients who may be at high risk, including:

  1. Gay, bisexual or other men who have sex with men (MSM)
  2. Sexually active women under the age of 25
  3. Pregnant women
  4. Patients who use ‘dating’ or ‘hookup’ apps like Jack’d, Grindr, Adam4Adam, etc.

Always follow CDC’s Treatment Guidelines and inform patients to abstain from sexual activity for 7 days after treatment is completed. The 2015 STD Treatment Guidelines app is available for download on iPhone and Android devices. 

Gonorrhea is developing resistance to the antibiotics used to treat it. In fact, we are down to one recommended effective class of antibiotics.

The recommended treatment regimen for uncomplicated gonorrhea is:

Ceftriaxone 250 mg IM in a single dose + Azithromycin 1g orally in a single dose

Retest patients with gonorrhea after 90 days to ensure they are not reinfected.

Chlamydia is the most frequently reported infectious disease in the U.S. Prevalence is highest in people under the age of 25. Annual screening for females under 25 years old is encouraged.
The recommended treatment regimen for chlamydia is:
Azithromycin 1g orally in a single dose OR Doxycycline 100mg orally twice a day for 7 days

Prevent Reinfection

Prevent reinfection by notifying and treating partners.

Consider Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT)

If a partner of a patient diagnosed with gonorrhea and/or chlamydia cannot be linked to evaluation and treatment in a timely fashion, consider EPT. EPT is the clinical practice of treating the sex partners of patients diagnosed with chlamydia or gonorrhea by providing prescriptions or medications to the patient to take to his/her partner without the health care provider first examining the partner. EPT is recommended for partners of gonorrhea, as not treating these partners is significantly more harmful than the use of EPT for gonorrhea.

EPT for partners of patients diagnosed with gonorrhea, but not chlamydia:

Cefixime 400 mg orally in a single dose + Azithromycin 1g orally in a single dose

EPT for partners of patients diagnosed with both gonorrhea and chlamydia:

Cefixime 400 mg orally in a single dose + Azithromycin 1g orally in a single dose

EPT for partners of patients diagnosed with chlamydia, but not gonorrhea:

Azithromycin 1g orally in a single dose

EPT is not routinely recommended for men who have sex with men (MSM) because of a high risk for coexisting infections.

Promote Safer Sex

Promote safer sex by encouraging your sexually active patients to use condoms consistently and correctly every time they have sex.

Establish Rapport

Establishing a rapport and taking a patient’s sexual history at every visit in a neutral, non-judgmental manner is key to successful STI testing, treatment, and prevention.

Keep In Mind

Remember, anyone who is sexually active can get gonorrhea and chlamydia.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you. If you have questions about gonorrhea, chlamydia, other STIs, or CDC treatment guidelines, we can help. If you think there’s something we can do better or if you have ideas about how to reduce STIs in our area, let us know: (708) 836-8637.

  • Demian Christiansen, DSc, MPH
    Unit Director Communicable Disease Control and Prevention Cook County Department of Public Health
  • Rachel Rubin, MD, MPH, FAAP
    Senior Public Health Officer Cook County Department of Public Health
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