English
Contact Us
Select Page

The vaccines can protect you from getting severe COVID-19

Getting vaccinated is the best way to keep yourself, your loved ones, and your community healthy.

Vax and Relax.

COVID-19 can have serious, life-threatening complications. If you get sick, you might spread the disease to friends, family, coworkers, and everyone around you.

If you’ve had the virus, you may have some natural protection, known as immunity, but we don’t know how long this protection lasts. The COVID-19 vaccinations will help protect you by creating an antibody response without having to experience sickness.

Wearing masks and social distancing will reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others, but these measures are not enough. Vaccines will work with your immune system so it will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed.

(April 23, 2021) CCDPH resumes distribution of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Please click here for more information.

We are committed to equity.

CCDPH is committed to an equitable distribution of vaccine, with an emphasis on communities that have been most dramatically impacted by COVID such as senior citizens and traditionally underserved populations. Click here to see CCDPH’s White Paper on our commitment to vaccine equity

Upcoming Community Events

COVID Vaccine FAQs

Read below for the common questions and answers related to the COVID-19 vaccination.

02. Vaccines (21)

Yes. All of the COVID-19 vaccines available in the United States are effective at reducing your chances of getting COVID-19, getting very sick, and dying from COVID-19. To maximize protection from the Delta variant and prevent possibly spreading it to others, you should continue to wear a mask indoors when in public, even if you are fully vaccinated.

Category: 02. Vaccines

All of the COVID-19 vaccines available in the United States are safe. Millions of people in the United States have received these vaccines under the most intense safety monitoring in U.S. history. We recommend that you get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible.

Category: 02. Vaccines

Yes. Businesses with health care, school or higher education employees or students are allowed to require proof of vaccination status for anyone, including visitors.

Category: 02. Vaccines

If you work in healthcare, at a school, college, university, state-owned or operated church or place of worship, and you are not fully vaccinated, you are required to get tested weekly. Employees who are exempt from the vaccine requirement due to a medical or religious reason must get tested weekly.

Category: 02. Vaccines

Many people have no side effects from the COVID-19 vaccination. Some people experience soreness where they received the vaccine, a headache or other side effects that make them feel under the weather for one or two days. These side effects are normal signs that your body is building protection against the virus.

Category: 02. Vaccines

Yes. If you are required to get vaccinated (because you work in healthcare, at a school, college/university or state-owned or operated church or place of worship), you do have the option to be tested weekly instead. However, your employer may have stricter requirements.

Categories: 0.5 Children, 02. Vaccines

Yes, you can get COVID-19 even if you already had it. Getting the vaccine will give you a strong boost in long-term protection against severe illness, hospitalization or death.

Tags: Guidance, Vaccine
Category: 02. Vaccines

Yes, health care workers, school personnel, higher education personnel and students, and state employees and contractors who work at state-owned or operated congregate facilities are required to be fully vaccinated or  undergo weekly testing and can provide confirmation of a negative test result on a weekly basis.

Category: 02. Vaccines

There is no federal or state mandate to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. The CDC recommends the vaccine to all Americans 12 and over.

Category: 02. Vaccines

All steps have been taken to ensure the vaccines are safe and effective.
Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines under the most intense safety monitoring in U.S. history.
The CDC recommends you get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as you can.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/safety-of-vaccines.html

Category: 02. Vaccines

It usually takes about two weeks after vaccination for your body to build protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. If you get a two-dose vaccine, you are not fully vaccinated until 2 weeks after your 2nd dose.

Category: 02. Vaccines

Yes. Having COVID-19 in the past does not give you lasting immunity. The COVID-19 vaccines can give you long-lasting immunity and also protect you against other COVID-19 variants.

Category: 02. Vaccines
The vaccines are working very well to prevent the worst cases of COVID-19 that lead to hospitalization or death, even against the highly contagious Delta variant. The virus is constantly changing and scientists are seeing reduced protection against mild and moderate disease. A booster dose is recommended for all individuals 18 years and older if it has been at least 6 months after receiving their second Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, or at least two months after receiving the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine.
Category: 02. Vaccines

Children and adolescents (ages 12-18 years) receive the same dosage of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine as adults. There are no weight requirements for vaccination and the dose is the same no matter what you weigh.

Categories: 0.5 Children, 02. Vaccines

The active ingredient in the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines is Messenger RNA (or mRNA). Messenger RNA is a protein that helps the body make antibodies to the COVID-19 virus. Antibodies are like soldiers that fight the virus. The vaccine gets your body ready to fight for when it recognizes the real virus.

Category: 02. Vaccines

Most side effects will go away on their own.
If you gave pain, redness or swelling on the arm where you got the shot, you can put a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the area. Keep using your arm as you usually do.
If you are feeling feverish, drink plenty of fluids and dress lightly. Talk to your doctor about taking an over-the-counter medicine, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.
If your side effects don’t go away within 3-4 days, talk to your doctor.

Category: 02. Vaccines

A booster shot is recommended due to concern that the effectiveness of the vaccine decreases over time and may not protect against a new strain, such as delta. Doctors use the term third dose when referring to people with compromised immune systems who may not have gotten the level of protection needed from the first two doses. The third dose provides additional immunity.

Tags: Boosters, Vaccine
Category: 02. Vaccines

As long as you are no longer in isolation or infectious, it is safe to get the vaccine. If you had symptoms of COVID-19, you are no longer infectious 10 days after your symptoms started. If you never had any symptoms of COVID-19, you are no longer infectious 10 days after the day you tested positive.

Category: 02. Vaccines

If you work in healthcare, at a school, college, university, state-owned or operated church or place of worship, you are required to be fully vaccinated.

Category: 02. Vaccines

No. There is no evidence that any vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause fertility problems in women or men.

Categories: 0.5 Children, 02. Vaccines

No. The COVID-19 vaccines do not contain any parts of the virus, so they can’t give you COVID-19.

Category: 02. Vaccines

COVID-19 Resources

COVID-19 Latest Guidance

patients getting vaccinated

Vaccine Information

covid-resources-for-families

General Resources

testing

Testing

ccdph one shot vaccine campaign

Our Shot Vaccine Campaign

contact-tracing-tile

Contact Tracing: Answer the call

Updated November 29, 2021, 1:07 PM

X